Essence & Qi

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It’s the Friday Wrap Up!

Oriental medicine in the news this week:

Exciting News: PCOM SD Faculty Member Tracie Livermore Receives Teacher of the Year Award!

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Each year, The American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) presents the “Jerome Perlinski Teacher of the Year” award. We are extremely proud to announce that the 2014 recipient is our very own PCOM SD faculty member, Tracie Livermore! Tracie received this honor because of her exceptional teaching abilities and commitment to high standards of education in massage therapy.

She has been on faculty at PCOM since 2002 and has also worked as a faculty member at Mueller College of Holistic Studies from 2005-2011. In addition to her contributions as an educator, Tracie has been in private massage practice since 1990, where she specializes in Thai Massage, Tui Na, Jin Shin, Deep Tissue massage and blends of all of the above. She is also certified in pre and perinatal massage. Tracie is a dedicated massage practitioner and has traveled to China and Thailand to enhance her skills and knowledge. She has also done extensive volunteer and pro-bono work with cancer patients. Tracie has a true passion for massage and considers it her life.

Tracie will receive her award during the AMTA National Convention, which will be held September 17-20 in Denver, Colorado.

Congratulations, Tracie! PCOM (and we’re sure many others) are proud of you!

A Buzzworthy Topic: Beeswax and Its Usefulness


At our PCOM San Diego campus, we host events called “pop!TALKS” which highlight trending topics. This month’s talk is called “The Buzz” and focuses on honeybees, saving the bees, and harvesting your own honey! In honor of our bee pop!TALK, we thought it would be fun to write about different uses for beeswax.

So, what can you use beeswax for? Take a look..

1.Beeswax can be used to loosen rusted nuts and bolts

When melted down, you can drip hot beeswax on nuts and bolts to make them easier to remove.

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2.Beeswax can be used to make candles

Beeswax candles are perfect for people who are sensitive to smoke and intense fragrances.

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3.Beeswax can be used to make windows and drawers slide easier

You can take the stub of a beeswax candle and rub it along the edges of drawers and tracks to avoid sticking.

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4. Beeswax can be used to condition and waterproof  boots, saddles, bags, or other leather products

To keep your leather goods up to par, rub beeswax into the leather with a dry cloth.

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5. Beeswax can be used to coat hand tools, shovels, or cast iron pieces to prevent rusting

The wax can serve to keep wooden handles in tip-top shape as well.

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6. Beeswax can be used to coat cheese

If you make your own cheese, hot beeswax is a great way to keep it from spoiling.

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7. Beeswax can be used to make crayons

Beeswax crayons tend to be harder, which allows for more details in pictures.

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8. Beeswax can be used for an envelope seal

You can apply beeswax to a letter that you are sending out (perfect for baby showers or invitations).

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 9. Beeswax can be used to grease cookie sheets

If you have a block of beeswax,  rub it over the surface of your baking sheets so that your cookies don’t stick!

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10. Beeswax can be used as furniture polish

You can combine beeswax with coconut oil to keep your furniture nice and clean.

Do you want to attend our April pop!TALK? Click here to learn what “The Buzz” is all about! 

It’s the Friday Wrap Up!

The herbs and spices used regularly in cooking are all a complex mix of organic compounds. This infographic highlights some of the main organic compounds found in each herb and spice that cause distinct flavors and aromas. Take a look and enjoy!

The herbs and spices used regularly in cooking are all a complex mix of organic compounds. This infographic highlights some of the main organic compounds found in each herb and spice that cause distinct flavors and aromas. Take a look and enjoy!

It’s All in Your Head: Cranio-Sacral Massage

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Cranio-sacral therapy is a gentle, non-invasive hands-on massage technique. This specific type of therapy works gently on the bones of the skull, spine, and pelvis to enhance the cranio-sacral system. The cranio-sacral system consists of the membranes and fluid that surround and protect the brain and spinal cord, as well as the attached bones. Cranio-sacral therapy is extremely beneficial and can be applied to anyone (at any age) who is looking for a relaxing experience.

The benefits of this modality are extensive. It can be used to increase resistance to disease, detoxify the system, boost immunity, and as a form of preventive healthcare. Cranio-sacral massage can also alleviate a wide range of medical problems associated with pain and dysfunction.

Take a look at this list of the medical concerns that cranio-sacral therapy can improve:

  • Migraines
  • Chronic neck and back pain
  • Motor-coordination impairments
  • Colic
  • Autism
  • Central nervous system disorders
  • Traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries
  • Infantile disorders
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Emotional difficulties
  • Stress and tension-related problems
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Temporal mandibular joint syndrome (TMJ)
  • Post-traumatic stress disorders and more

It’s not uncommon for patients to have powerful emotional releases during a cranio-sacral massage therapy session. Get ready for a truly healing experience!

Massage is a wonderful way to rid yourself of stress and achieve peace of mind. If you’re ready to schedule an appointment, don’t hesitate to give our clinic a call! See you soon.

It’s the Friday Wrap Up!

Oriental medicine in the news this week:

East Meets West at PCOM: Our San Diego Campus Hosts Visiting Scholars from China and Japan!

PCOM continues to deepen relationships with various institutions in Asia.  On March 14th, PCOM had the honor of hosting visiting scholars from China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences (CACMS). Located in Beijing, China, CACMS is a national comprehensive institution for scientific research, clinical medicine and medical education on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). As the largest research organization on TCM throughout the country, the academy has 13 institutes, six hospitals (which integrate Eastern and Western medicine), the Graduate School, the Publishing House of Ancient Chinese Medical Books and the Journal of TCM, as well as three World Health Organization (WHO) centers.

During their visit, CACMS directors Wei Cao, Dongli Gu, Liang Li, Xiaobei Ma, and Hui Zhao, were gracious enough to speak with us about the academy and its TCM research. By the end of 2005, the academy had taken on a total of 450 research projects. Today, 1,000 research projects are underway, covering a broad range of subjects from oncology to HIV/AIDS. Along with their extensive medical research projects, CACMS is working on another task: digitizing rare, precious Chinese texts. The goal of the project is to allow valuable TCM information to be searchable and sharable for all.

Each year at the academy, around 130 master’s students and 50 doctorates go on to graduate and continue the practice of East Asian medicine. The CACMS and its students ensure that the practice of TCM will remain intact for many years to come.

Visiting scholars with PCOM SD staff:

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During the month of March, PCOM also welcomed returning visitors from Morinmoya University in Osaka, Japan. Here for a week’s duration, the group consisted of seven students and two administrators. The main objective of their visit was to deepen their relationship with PCOM and to learn and explore more about East Asian medicine orthopedics and facial rejuvenation. All seven students had the chance to attend lectures and demonstrations with Dr. East Haradin, LAc on facial rejuvenation and Ian Armstrong, LAc on orthopedics. The students participated in clinical case rounds in various locations including Old Town Acupuncture , Cinnabar Acupuncture, and RIMAC. They were also given the opportunity to carry out clinic case rounds with PCOM San Diego Clinic Director, Greg Lane, where each student received acupuncture treatments.

Take a look at the “Thank You” card we received from the students after their visit!

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